An aerial shot of Area 51.

IMPORTANT Message:
PLEASE DO NOT ENGAGE AREA 51
It is the responsibility of the United States citizen to respect government spaces, no matter the conspiracy.

The Area 51 conspiracy concerns the location of a secret military base at Groom Lake, Nevada, USA that conducted experimental programs in aerospace technology during the Cold War.[1] The ground base came into public awareness in 1989 when Bob Lazar had disclosed its name and location on Nevada TV. Prior to 1989, Area 51 was not in the public's vocabulary. In ufology of the 1990s it was then tied into the Roswell mythology.

Disclosure

See also: Area 51 disclosure


The name "Area 51" was first publicized by Bob Lazar in 1989 on Nevada TV. At the time, it was an unheard of location and his claims of reverse engineering were largely dismissed by skeptics.[Note 1]

However on 18 April 2000,[Note 2] the New York Times reported on the U.S. government’s admission of the existence of Area 51 — "We acknowledge having an operating site there, and the work is classified." Air Force spokeswoman Gloria Cales.[2]

Propulsion conspiracy

In May 1989, Bob Lazar went public about the US government possessing anti-matter propulsion technology at Area 51, and that throughout the Cold War, they've been trying to reverse engineer it.

Although the claims for anti-matter propulsion are said to be "extraterrestrial" in origin by enthusiasts, its real origins are feared to be associated with Nazi technology confiscated after World War II. The Rundflugzeug (RFZ) program conducted by the SS (Schutzstaffel), is believed to be exotic propulsion research that had been in development since 1920, out of the University of Munich, Germany.

Research and development for anti-matter propulsion technology may be at the crux of atomic bomb research, which had major breakthroughs by the 1930s amongst many big player governments. The Allies were aware of Germany's leading research in anti-matter, and thus needed to knock out the Third Reich in order to monopolize it. The US Operation Paperclip and the Soviet's Operation Osoaviakhim targeted high German scientists to immigrate them to allied Nations 1945/47, for their anti-matter research. Such secrets ultimately led to space exploration during the "Space Race" between the United States and Russia. Testing and reversing Nazi research had been conducted at the US Area 51; and for the Russians, at Kapustin Yar (Капустин Яр) during the Cold War.

Alien conspiracy

In the alien conspiracy, alleged anti-matter propulsion technology is suspected to originate with an unknown extraterrestrial intelligence. Many believe that it has been housed at Area 51, as early as Roswell. For thirty years, Bob Lazar has specifically maintained that the exotic technology was contained at S-4—a nine hanger installation built into the Papoose mountain range just south of Groom Lake's Area 51.

The Area 51 ground base may only have been the testing grounds for modified technologies, as suggested from a History Channel program. Due to the constant exposure of Area 51 in pop culture, it is quite likely that any black projects related to exotic technology and/or biology has long been removed. The 2019 semi-joke announcement to raid Area 51 is a really bad idea—You will get shot for nothing.[3]

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Since 2008, ‘aliens at Area 51’ have been instigated by Dan Burisch (alias) who flaunts “S-2”, a piggyback off of Lazar’s S-4 claims some twenty years later. The motif for a prequel to Lazar’s S-4 was also seen with the S-3 claims that came out a decade after Lazar’s 1989 interview, concerning Jonas Valley in Ilm-Kreis district of Germany.

Dan Burisch’s meal ticket on ‘aliens at Area 51’ tailgate the worldwide UFO files released which started in 2007. By 2010, the US opened up the FBI’s records Vault on Unexplained Phenomenon. A few years later, Burisch’s alien tales were then publicized by C. Ronald Garner in his book, “Alien Disclosure at Area 51: Dr. Dan Burisch Reveals the Truth About ETs, UFOs and MJ-12”.

But—the truth is, there are no aliens at Area 51. Everyone is looking in the wrong place. Lazar (1989) pointed to alienware at Papoose mountain range, and Bennewitz (1982) pointed to Manzano Base and Dulce Base in New Mexico.

Mag-rail conspiracy

The existence of a DUMB has not yet been confirmed at Area 51. However, John Lear supports the alleged underground magrail system that allegedly connects Area 51 to the Las Vegas Strip. Its construction is said to have been built under the guise of the Echelon project — a failed casino construction project, that served as a cover to connect the Las Vegas Strip to Area 51's mag-rail system. The secret construction phase was about a five-year project starting in 2007. The Luxor is said to be one of a few casinos that connects to this underground transport system. The transport system is immense, and is suspected to connect to Hawthorne Army Depot (a Naval Undersea Warfare Center project). The system travels north as far as Wendover, Utah. It likely connects to a suspected DUMB at a secret connection point that was part of the former Wendover Air Force Base. Triangle UFOs have been sighted in this area (Lear, 2018).

Notes

  1. In October 2014, Boyd Bushman, an alleged Lockheed SkunkWorks scientist also made a deathbed confession to the legitimacy of Area 51.
  2. Notice how US history is changed by Wikipedia who gives a 2013 date of US acknowledgement by the CIA. Follow Encyclopedia Brritannica who assumes Wikipedia’s year 2013 for US acknowledgement of Area 51, when in fact the New York Times had previously reported on the US government’s official acknowledgment of Area 51 in year 2000. The Year 2013 serves as an archive date.

References

  1. "Area 51 Test Site". F-117A. 14 July 2003. Archived from the original on 22 October 2013. Retrieved 10 June 2013.
  2. New York Times, Satellite Images of Area 51 Are Being Put on the Web By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
  3. TIME, The Military Has a Warning for Anyone Interested In Raiding Area 51 In An Attempt To Free Aliens by JASMINE AGUILERA, JULY 16, 2019

External links

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