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This conspiracy is historical fact.

The mind control conspiracy involves programs that began funding by the Soviet Union and the United States during the Cold War, as early as the 1950s. The US program was called Project MKULTRA, conducted by the CIA.[1] Examples of mind control programs, under MKULTRA, were Monarch Project and the Silva Mind Control classes.

Conspiracy[]

The CIA tested LSD and other hallucinogenic drugs on Americans in a top-secret experiment of behavior modification, known as MK-ULTRA. The CIA started out by accepting volunteers. Novelist Ken Kesey was one notable subject. The program escalated to dosing people without their knowledge, leaving many victims permanently mentally disabled. Another suspected experimental drug, that alters food and perception, is methamphetamine.[2]

Propaganda[]

The Human Dimension – Experiences in Policy Research, by Hadley Cantril:

Psycho-political operations are propaganda campaigns designed to create perpetual tension and to manipulate different groups of people to accept the particular climate of opinion the CFR seeks to achieve in the world.

Canadian writer Ken Adachi (1929 – 1989):

What most Americans believe to be ‘Public Opinion’ is in reality carefully crafted and scripted propaganda designed to elicit a desired behavioral response from the public.

US mind control programme[]

c. 1950- Project MKULTRA established
c. 1958- CIA uses abandoned Army reservation on Eastside of Montauk Point for Project MKULTRA programs that extends underground.
c. 1963- Silva Mind Control courses commercially offered to the public
c. 1964- Montauk Point begins with physics and radar research, then later extends to mind control experiments on humans in an underground blacksite facility.
c. 1965- Men in Black recruitment of children in Silva Mind Control classes, escelates to abductions for Monarch mind control project.
c. 1975- Project MKUltra disclosed to the public
c. 1978- Air Force submits proposal to the Carter Administration to close the base
c. 1983- Duncan Cameron disrupts Montauk project operations
c. 1984- Montauk Point sealed and abandoned

Relfe’s abduction[]

The following mind control commands were induced on Michael Relfe during abduction routines at Montauk,[3] since the age of eight.[4] Relfe may also have been subjected to an advanced type of influencing machine.[5] All of the commands listed are seemingly by the playbook of the Monarch Project.

Conditioning commands[6]
  1. “Don't make love”.
  2. “You can't perform”.
  3. “No woman wants to have sex with you”.
  4. “You can't keep it up”
Here he got the realisation that they wanted him to love no one but them.[6]
  1. “You can't trust anyone”
  2. “You have no friends”
  3. “Women are sluts”
  4. “You don't need anyone”
Mission commands[7]
  1. “Keep everything secret”
  2. “Don't betray”
  3. “Tell no one”
  4. “You're special”
  5. “Keep your word”
  6. “There's nothing there”, Repeat " There's nothing there".
  7. “Fight the enemy”
  8. “Never give up”
  9. “Tell the truth”
  10. “Loyalty and honour”
Erasing commands[8]
  1. "You won't remember this"
  2. "Erase your memories"
  3. "Block this"
  4. "You will forget"
  5. "This didn't happen"
  6. "You're imagining things"
  7. "This isn't real"
  8. "You're dreaming"
  9. "This can't be happening"
  10. "It's only a dream"
Commands continued...
  1. "Forget all about it"
  2. "You won't remember this"
  3. "Forget everything you've seen here"
  4. "Go back to sleep"
  5. "Keep dreaming"
  6. "You will forget about us"
  7. "Aliens are not real"[9]
  8. "It's all science fiction"
  9. "You will forget everything"
  10. "Your memories are gone"

See also[]

References[]

  1. 12 crazy conspiracy theories that actually turned out to be true, by Lauren Cahn
  2. 12 crazy conspiracy theories that actually turned out to be true, by Lauren Cahn
  3. The Mars Records (2000), by Stephanie Relfe, p.46
  4. Relfe, p. 102
  5. Relfe, p. 118-121
  6. 6.0 6.1 Relfe, p. 108
  7. Relfe, p. 116
  8. Relfe, p. 131
  9. Relfe, p. 132

Resources[]