World War conspiracy is that World War I, and World War II was orchestrated, promoted, and supported for the Power Elites to make profit.

Conspiracy[edit | edit source]

Highly decorated U.S. General Smedley D. Butler, who held two esteemed Medals of Honor, highlighted in his 1935 book War Is a Racket, that 'War is possibly the oldest, easily the most profitable, and surely the most vicious. It is the only one in which the profits are reckoned in dollars and the losses in lives. In the World War a mere handful garnered the profits of the conflict. At least 21,000 new millionaires and billionaires were made in the United States during the World War. That many admitted huge gains in their income tax returns. How many other war millionaires falsified their tax returns no one knows.' [Note that these are 1935 U.S. dollars. To adjust for inflation, multiply all figures X 15 or more].[1]

US profits[edit | edit source]

War Is a Racket (1935) by US Marine Corps major general, Smedley Butler

"The World War cost the United States some $52 billion. That means $400 [over $6,000 in today's dollars] to every American man, woman, and child. The normal yearly profits of a business concern in the U.S. are 6 to 12%. But war-time profits, that is another matter – 60, 100, 300, and even 1,800% – the sky is the limit. Uncle Sam has the money. Let's get it. Of course, it isn't put that crudely in war time. It is dressed into speeches about patriotism, love of country, and "we must all put our shoulders to the wheel," but the profits jump, leap, and skyrocket – and are safely pocketed.
"Take our friends the du Ponts, the powder people. The average pre-war earnings of the du Ponts for the period 1910 to 1914 were $6 million a year. Now let's look at their average yearly profit during the war years, 1914 to 1918. $58 million a year profit we find! Nearly ten times that of normal times, and the profits of normal times were pretty good. An increase in profits of more than 950%.
"Had secrecy been outlawed as far as war negotiations, and had the press been invited to be present at that conference, America never would have entered the war. But this conference, like all war discussions, was shrouded in utmost secrecy. When our boys were sent off, they were told it was a "war to make the world safe for democracy" and a "war to end all wars." Very little has been accomplished to assure us that the World War was really the war to end all wars. Disarmament conferences don't mean a thing. At all these conferences, lurking in the background are the sinister agents of those who profit by war. They see to it that these conferences do not seriously limit armaments."

—General Smedley Butler. War is a Racket (1935)

References[edit | edit source]

  1. wanttoknow, War Cover-up
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